All posts by Jennifer Jensen

About Jennifer Jensen

email: jennifer.jensen@us.pwc.com Mobile: +1 240 678 0226 Office: +1 202 414 1741

Jennifer is a state and local tax director in PwC Washington National Tax Services specializing in sales and use and indirect taxes. Her industry focus is in technology, entertainment, media, and communications. Jennifer helps lead the firm's cloud computing initiative and is the state and local subject matter expert in this area. Jennifer provides both internal firm and external client sales and use tax training in such issues as eCommerce, the taxation of digital products, and, of course, cloud computing. She also summarizes relevant legislation or other tax law changes to disseminate both externally and internally and writes thought leadership pieces for external publication by the firm.

US – The disparate state and local tax treatment of digital streaming services

In recent months, multiple jurisdictions have issued guidance regarding the taxability of digital streaming services. These developments signify a growing trend by states to address whether and how such products and services should be taxed. Similar to other trending areas, such as Software as a Service (SaaS), states and cities must initially determine how to classify digital streaming based on existing state and local tax rules. As the following recent developments illustrate, companies offering digital streaming services, as well as consumers of such services, should be aware of the potential for divergent tax determinations across the different states. Find out more

USA – Internet Tax Freedom Act (ITFA) temporarily extended through 11 December 2014

On September 18, 2014, President Obama signed House Joint Resolution 124, which includes provisions extending the Internet Tax Freedom Act (ITFA) through December 11. The Act was previously scheduled to expire November 1, 2014, and the extension gives Congress a chance to consider the ITFA’s long-term future during the lame-duck session after the midterm elections.

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USA – Michigan Court finds certain cloud computing services not subject to sales and use tax

The Michigan Court of Claims recently held in a summary disposition that remotely accessed software is not subject to Michigan sales and use tax. The court held that software accessed remotely was neither tangible personal property nor ‘used’ by the taxpayer as defined under Michigan statutes. Further, any prewritten computer software provided to the customer was only an incidental component of the various services purchased and did not subject the charges to tax. [Auto-Owners Insurance Company v. Department of Treasury, State of Michigan Court of Claims, No. 12-000082-MT (March 20, 2014)]

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USA: Taxing Internet commerce: What global retailers need to know

With the availability of high speed Internet access, smart phones, and tablets, it is not surprising that the global retail industry is experiencing a fundamental shift in how individual consumers research, select, and eventually purchase products. Individuals are shopping through a variety of different channels, some physical, some virtual, making for an easier and more streamlined shopping experience. E-commerce has quickly become a key channel for retailers to reach their customers. This embrace of digital technology and social media is creating a new landscape for retailers as they ensure that their policies and practices support these changes. These shifting business models are creating unique consumption tax issues for global retailers selling within and into the United States.

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USA: Illinois Supreme Court rules click-through nexus law pre-empted by Internet Tax Freedom Act

On October 18, 2013, in a 6-1 decision, the Illinois Supreme Court ruled that the state’s click-through nexus law is pre-empted by the federal Internet Tax Freedom Act’s ban against ‘discriminatory taxes on electronic commerce.’ The court did not reach the issue regarding whether the click-through nexus provision violated the US Commerce Clause. [Performance Marketing Association, Inc. v. Hamer, Ill. Sup. Ct., #114496 (10/18/13)]

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USA: Digital products and remote sales subject to sales tax in Minnesota

On May 23, 2013, Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton signed H.F 677, which makes significant changes to Minnesota’s sales and use tax, including taxing digital goods, adding click-through nexus provisions, authorizing multiple points of use exemption certificates, and requiring remote sellers to collect and pay sales and use tax consistent with federal legislation.

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USA: Products transferred electronically subject to sales and use tax in Maine

Effective June 26, 2013, Maine sales tax applies to products transferred electronically. A “product transferred electronically” is sold in Maine if:

– the product is delivered electronically to a purchaser located in Maine;

– the product is received by the purchaser at the seller’s location in Maine;

– a Maine billing address is provided by the purchaser in connection with the transaction; or

– a Maine billing address is indicated in the seller’s business records.

A “product transferred electronically” is a digital product transferred to a purchaser electronically, the sale of which in non-digital physical form would be subject to tax as a sale of tangible personal property.

This legislation, H.P. 1079, was passed despite the Governor’s veto.

USA: Missouri adopts affiliate and click-through nexus standards for sales and use tax

On July 5, 2013, Missouri enacted S.B. 23 which provides affiliate and click-through nexus standards for sales and use tax purposes.

Out-of-state vendors selling taxable products or services to Missouri customers should review whether activities of in-state affiliates or third parties create a sales and use tax registration and filing obligation with the state. This is relevant also for ecommerce vendors.

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USA: West Virginia – Affiliate nexus adopted for sales and use tax to cover also Internet-based business

Effective January 1, 2014, West Virginia expands the definition of a “retailer engaging in business in this state” for sales and use tax purposes to include affiliates which operate a website or Internet business within the state.  Specifically, “any retailer that is related to, or part of a unitary business with, a person, entity or business that . . . is a subsidiary of the retailer, or is related to, or unitary with, the retailer as a related entity, a related member or part of a unitary business” that meets one of the following criteria will be required to collect and remit taxes in West Virginia: Find out more