Tag Archives: ecommerce

German Federal Ministry decrees on joint VAT liability for onliny marketplaces

With effect from 1 January 2019, a new rule has been introduced in Germany to make the operator of an online marketplace jointy liable for German VAT no accounted for by the online traders on goods sold via the marketplace.

For further details please see the newsflash from PwC Germany:

https://blogs.pwc.de/steuern-und-recht/files/2019/03/VAT-Newsflash-02-2019.pdf

VAT-Newsflash-02-2019

 

 

 

New Zealand’s New GST Collection Model for Low Value Imported Goods

The latest New Zealand low value imported goods changes are another of many occurring globally in the e-commerce indirect taxes area. On December 5, 2018 the New Zealand government introduced into Parliament the Taxation Bill that is a landmark development proposing new rules that will require offshore sellers, from October 1, 2019, to register and account for Goods and Services Tax (‘‘GST’’) at 15 percent on supplies of low value imported goods (‘‘LVIGs’’) if sales to New Zealand private consumers in a 12-month period exceed NZ$60,000 ($41,380). The $60,000 threshold is the same GST registration threshold that applies to domestic businesses and offshore suppliers of cross-border remote services.

For detailed information please see the below link or the attached article from Eugen Trombitas, PwC NZ Partner and PwC Global E-commerce indirect taxes leader, published in Bloomberg International Tax News.

https://www.bna.com/insight-new-zealands-n57982094757/

NZ GST article

Latest EU proposals concerning e-commerce

The e-Commerce VAT package of the EU introduces simplification measures for intra-EU sales of electronic services from 2019 onwards, and also extends by 2021 the Mini One-Stop Shop to a One Stop Shop. Furthermore, new rules for electronic interfaces such as marketplaces or platforms will be introduced, which deem them for VAT purposes (in certain scenarios) to be the supplier of goods sold to customers in the EU and make them collect and pay the VAT on these sales.

Detailed implementation rules have been published în December on:

  • the extension of the scope of the Mini One Stop Shop (MOSS) to all types of services as well as to intra-community distance sales of goods and distance sales of imported goods from third countries – turning the MOSS into a One Stop Shop; and
  • the introduction of special provisions applicable to operators of electronic marketplaces, platform, portal or similar means with the effect that the these persons may be deemed to have received and supplied the goods itself applying from 1 January 2021.

The Proposal is available via this LINK and contains more detailed explanations of the following specific provisions.

Find out more

New Zealand – update by Eugen Trombitas (PwC global ITX e-commerce leader)

Remote services

The NZ remote services (RS) rules have been in force since 1 October 2016 and are regarded as a remarkable success by NZ Inland Revenue. Over 150 offshore sellers have registered and more than NZ$125 million of annual GST has been generated – the GST collected is more than 4 times the original estimates. NZ Inland Revenue deserves credit for the informative education campaign on the RS rules and efficient service when the rules first came in.

Find out more

Australian GST changes from 1 July 2017

1 July 2017, supplies of things other than goods or real property made to an ‘Australian consumer’ will be connected with Australia and subject to GST. The Australian provisions are broader than some other jurisdictions and essentially anything other than goods or real property are caught, and if an entity’s GST turnover exceeds the registration turnover threshold of AUD 75,000, it would be required to register for GST in Australia. Non-resident suppliers will be able to access a limited and simplified GST registration, although they can also register under the full registration procedure.

Where supplies of inbound intangibles are made through an Electronic Distribution Platform (EDP), the GST liability on these supplies would shift to the operator of the EDP (i.e. generally, online marketplaces that act as intermediaries). The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) has released a draft Law Companion Guideline (LCG 2017/D4) dealing with the EDP provisions.

In addition, under proposals still before Parliament (the Treasury Laws Amendment (Goods and Services Tax (GST) Low Value Goods) Bill 2017), low-value goods (AUD 1,000 and under) supplied by overseas retailers to Australian consumers would become taxable supplies  beginning 1 July 2017. The Bill was referred to the Senate Economics Legislation Committee which recommended that the implementation of the measures be delayed to 1 July 2018. The Bill is listed to be debated in Parliament in June 2017.

Please see the attached newsletter for further details.

Australia-gst-changes-13jun17

Australia – changes to the GST rules for online sales of goods

The Australian Federal Treasurer announced yesterday that it will be discussing GST measures with State Treasurers today with a view to announcing changes to the Australian GST rules for online sales of goods into Australia. You may be aware that currently goods sold into Australia under A$1,000 (approx. USD 730) are not subject to GST or duty.

At this stage, we do not have any details of the precise changes, but on the basis of statements made by the Treasurer, it is assumed that the measures are likely to involve a requirement for a non-resident seller to register and account for GST on the sales of all goods into Australia. Such a change may not impact on the current import rules, potentially meaning that goods imported into Australia below the current A$1,000 low value threshold could continue to remain free of customs duties. Find out more

Online shopping – PwC’s Total Retail Survey 2015

Fifteen years ago, in the heyday of the e-business boom, Internet promised to change industries and business models very quickly, first of all in the retail sector. When these promised changes did not realise that quick, it resulted in the burst of the dot-com bubble.

However, even if change took longer than expected, now it is already part of our lives and not only in the developed countries, but all around the world. New online business models have a disruptive effect on long established businesses, as the fate of firms, such as Blockbuster, Borders and quite recently, RadioShack shows.

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USA – Internet Tax Freedom Act (ITFA) temporarily extended through 11 December 2014

On September 18, 2014, President Obama signed House Joint Resolution 124, which includes provisions extending the Internet Tax Freedom Act (ITFA) through December 11. The Act was previously scheduled to expire November 1, 2014, and the extension gives Congress a chance to consider the ITFA’s long-term future during the lame-duck session after the midterm elections.

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