Tag Archives: internet shop

German Federal Ministry decrees on joint VAT liability for onliny marketplaces

With effect from 1 January 2019, a new rule has been introduced in Germany to make the operator of an online marketplace jointy liable for German VAT no accounted for by the online traders on goods sold via the marketplace.

For further details please see the newsflash from PwC Germany:

https://blogs.pwc.de/steuern-und-recht/files/2019/03/VAT-Newsflash-02-2019.pdf

VAT-Newsflash-02-2019

 

 

 

Latest EU proposals concerning e-commerce

The e-Commerce VAT package of the EU introduces simplification measures for intra-EU sales of electronic services from 2019 onwards, and also extends by 2021 the Mini One-Stop Shop to a One Stop Shop. Furthermore, new rules for electronic interfaces such as marketplaces or platforms will be introduced, which deem them for VAT purposes (in certain scenarios) to be the supplier of goods sold to customers in the EU and make them collect and pay the VAT on these sales.

Detailed implementation rules have been published în December on:

  • the extension of the scope of the Mini One Stop Shop (MOSS) to all types of services as well as to intra-community distance sales of goods and distance sales of imported goods from third countries – turning the MOSS into a One Stop Shop; and
  • the introduction of special provisions applicable to operators of electronic marketplaces, platform, portal or similar means with the effect that the these persons may be deemed to have received and supplied the goods itself applying from 1 January 2021.

The Proposal is available via this LINK and contains more detailed explanations of the following specific provisions.

Find out more

Online shopping – PwC’s Total Retail Survey 2015

Fifteen years ago, in the heyday of the e-business boom, Internet promised to change industries and business models very quickly, first of all in the retail sector. When these promised changes did not realise that quick, it resulted in the burst of the dot-com bubble.

However, even if change took longer than expected, now it is already part of our lives and not only in the developed countries, but all around the world. New online business models have a disruptive effect on long established businesses, as the fate of firms, such as Blockbuster, Borders and quite recently, RadioShack shows.

Find out more

Czech virtual currency update

The new Czech virtual currency, Czech Crown Coin (officially named by the authors “CZC”) was for the first time offered to the public this week (Tuesday, 19th August) at noon, as part of a press conference held by its founders. The interest of the public in purchasing CZC was bigger than expected. The pre-mined amount released in the initial edition of 100,000 CZC was sold out within nine and half hours, whereby a third of this limited amount was sold already within the first hour! It is planned that within the next days, an additional set of 100,000 CZC will be offered to the public. After these ten days (on Friday, 29 August) an exchange platform will be opened on the official website of CZC.

Find out more

The first Czech virtual currency starts today!

Another virtual currency was “borne” today (17 July 2014) at noon. A Czech Crown Coin (the abbreviation used by the authors is “CZC”) as it is called, is established. The announced amount of coins is 100 million and the currency will be, similarly to other virtual currencies, mined. The mining website was opened at the same moment. Half of the total volume of CZCs has been already pre-mined, the other half should be mined within the next 4 to 10 years. The distribution of a limited number of free-of-charge coins to registered Czech citizens is announced to start in the first half of September 2014.
Find out more

Featured: China – The Great Leap Online

China’s sustained economic expansion over the past three decades has created an entire generation of new consumers. February 2013 issue of PwC’s r&c worlds Express update sheds light on Chinese consumers’ online shopping habits, based on the responses of 900 Chinese shoppers to a recent PwC survey. The Chinese consumers in our survey exhibit unique shopping patterns; for example, shopping far more often and using more on-the-go technology than survey respondents in the West.

The Chinese shoppers are adopting the Internet as a retail channel much faster than their global peers and running ahead of the pack in terms of using new devices and social media. Find out more

Featured: 10 myths of multichannel retailing

This is the sixth consecutive year that PwC has published a study of online shoppers, and our second truly global survey.

Below are some highlights from this year’s report.

  • 59% of respondents follow brands or retailers on social media, compared to 49% last year
  • When it comes to their favorite brands and retailers, 38% of our respondents are following them on social media; up from 33% last year
  • 27% of respondents discovered brands through social media, compared to 17% last year
  • Fully 49% of our survey sample said they use social media every day, an increase of 14% over last year
  • Find out more

Switzerland: The multi-channel shopper is changing the retail landscape

PwC surveyed 7,005 consumers worldwide, including 1,000 respondents from Switzerland. The single biggest conclusion that we drew from our study is that consumers are outpacing traditional retailers and online pure-players are closing the gap. Consumers choose the channel that best suits their needs, doing their research predominantly online for products before buying the product in a store. Besides company websites, more and more consumers are researching and following brands via social media.
Find out more

EU: Internet sellers are jointly liable for import duties

The European Court of Justice (ECJ) has recently passed a decision in a Case C‑454/10 Oliver Jestel regarding the question of who is liable for the payment of customs duties when goods are imported into the EU. The case involved an Online shop within the EU, where the shop owner was acting as an intermediary between the fraudulent seller and the customers. ECJ has essentially deemed that the shop owner is co-liable for the payment of the costumes duties and import VAT, which should have been paid (but were not) be the foreign seller, as the shop owner should have been aware that the seller is selling goods illegally imported into the EU.
Find out more